A note from the Doc: The references to planets and constellations on this site are not astrological in nature, merely the clearest way to reference these positions and angles. For more, please read: Astrology or Astronomy »

Basic charts explained/ update - 12.23.05


Climate modeling in Doc Weather is explained in this sequence of charts as an aid to working with this site.


Linking the movements of the planets to specific climate events is the heart of the work in Doc Weather. In this article Doc Weather shares some insights into climate patterns from the point of view of what could be called planetary geometries. The key to the charts in Doc Weather is that certain areas on the earth seem to respond to planetary motions in certain time frames This model uses advanced geometries that are subtle but dependable.


Fig.1


Fig.1
the basic chart

The chart in (fig 1) depicts the northern hemisphere divided into twelve equal sections of 30° each. Each section is further divided into intervals of 5°. This chart is the center of the system used in Doc Weather. It has been developed through many different forms over the past 24 years. On the chart an eclipse point is shown in the middle of the Atlantic. This is the geodetic or precise geographical projection of the position of the longitude of an eclipse point in the heavens. The data for the correct placement was found in the Michelsen Sidereal Ephemeris 2001-2035.. This is the reverse of the standard projection of a terrestrial position into the heavens that provides the basis for astronomy. The projection of the Zodiac onto Earth allows for a system to be designed in which celestial motions can be tracked in the motions of weather patterns.

In the Doc Weather charts, the position of the spring equinox at 23° Aries is projected down onto the earth at 0° longitude in Greenwich (red line from Africa to the UK). This placement spreads the twelve 30° sections of the Zodiac across the equator in the form of the chart. From such a chart it is then possible to project the position of eclipses onto specific geographical locations and find the earthly equivalent to a planetary event. The placement of eclipses onto this chart is the most fundamental aspect of studying planetary events and linking them to climate changes.


Fig.2


Fig.2
line of lows on the day of an eclipse

As an experiment, download a difax 500 mb flow chart for the whole northern hemisphere on the day of an eclipse. On that day the chances are that you might see centers of low pressure lining up in a straight line going through the polar regions. (fig 2) In figure 2 (a Doc Weather polar chart) there is a red line running from the eclipse point at 15° Pisces (in the middle of the Atlantic) across the North Pole to a point at 15° Virgo in the western Pacific. This red line is known as the eclipse line in Doc Weather. The eclipse line connects the position in longitude of the sun on the day of either a solar or lunar eclipse to a position 180° on the opposite side of the circle. By looking in a Michelsen Sidereal Ephemeris 2001-2025, for the position of the Sun on the day of an eclipse and drawing the eclipse line on a Doc Weather polar chart (print out figure 1) you will be able to compare the positions of air masses on the difax chart with the position of an eclipse line drawn on the Doc Weather chart. To compare the two, look for the position of the eclipse line on the difax chart and draw the eclipse line on the difax chart. More often than not, there will be a noticeable line of low-pressure areas on either side of an eclipse line. Experiments like this show that it is possible to rationally link planetary motion to weather phenomena.


Fig.3


Fig.3
eclipse zone

To see more deeply into these patterns, however, we need to expand the Doc Weather chart by adding two eclipse generated lines to create a field of what we could call eclipse zones. In (fig 3) we can see a chart that has a violet field between the two eclipse lines. There are also two small blue circles in the violet field. The blue circles represent areas that can be expected to be a sensitive zone when planets move in longitude between either of the eclipse points on either end of the lines. These high latitude eclipse zones often are the sites of unusual high pressure blocking patterns when any planet is moving in longitude between the two eclipse points. Any planetary motion along the circumference of the chart is known as motion in arc in the language of astronomy. The previously mentioned Michelsen ephemeris is a source of data about motion in arc for all of the planets. The daily movement increments of each planet along the arc of the circle, is the key driving force in the eclipse grid system used by Doc Weather. Once again, the two blue circles represent zones that can be watched for unusual climate patterns when any planet is moving in arc between the two eclipse points on either side of the chart. It should be noted that the eclipse point and its opposite point in longitude (the reflex point) are both counted in the eclipse grid system even though rationally there is no actual point in space present for the reflex points. In figure 3 the points are named as they would be in a research chart in Doc Weather.


Fig.4


Fig.4
arctic front

There are other zones that are sensitive to the movement of the planets besides the high latitude eclipse zones. In figure 4 a zone is depicted that, through many experiments, has shown to be influential in the area known to climatologists as the arctic front. The arctic front is a band of winds that circle the northern hemisphere at a high latitude, between 70° N latitude and 60° N. By drawing lines across the chart from an eclipse point (the solar eclipse point at 3° Virgo in the western Pacific) to touch the upper zone of the arctic front and the lower edge of the arctic front a disturbance area is formed (violet colored wedge). This wedge crosses the arctic front at a high latitude. If a planet were transiting the solar eclipse point then the arctic front where it is crossed by the violet wedge could be relied upon to be the site of an outbreak of polar cold. This is depicted by the blue arrow.

It has often been observed that if, for instance, an eclipse point were to be positioned at 3° Virgo and be disturbed by Mars or the Moon crossing it, the polar jet stream would breakout of the narrow zone bracketed by 70°N ands 60° N in the longitude of the violet wedge area, and loop to the south. It can be seen that the two lines that form the violet wedge that brackets the arctic front are at angles of 144° and 135° of arc from the eclipse point. These angles are not random. A more in depth article on these angles and the formation of the wedge can be found in the subscribers section at harmonics of storms However, to understand the dynamics of the basic chart, the in depth understanding of why the zones are placed is not necessary.

When a loop in the jet stream flows south out of the arctic front climatologists call this pattern meridional flow. This is because it flows along the N to S meridians of longitude. This is depicted in fig 4 as a curved blue arrow. This type of pattern often emerges in the arctic front when a planet crosses the eclipse point. Climatologists call the pattern of the blue arrow a trough. This is formed when the meridional flow creates a bowl shape that is open to the north. Troughs are the sites of strong storm or low- pressure events since they are the main avenues for cold air to move to the south from the Polar Regions.


Fig.5


Fig.5
subtropical front

The opposite pattern to a trough is a block. Blocks arise when a planet is passing between the eclipse points at what Doc Weather calls a high-pressure value. For more information on this please see
planetary approach and retreat on the Doc Weather site The block in figure 5 is the red curved arrow running from south to north and back again in the mid Pacific. A block generally rises from a southern latitude and moves north towards the polar front. It also runs meridionally but it generally is a way for warm air to move towards the poles. It has its origins in the tropics in what is known as the sub tropical front. The sub tropical front is the large red circle in figure 5. Two different lines are drawn to create another violet colored wedge coming from the eclipse point. These two lines (90° and 108°) bracket the northern extent and southern extent of the subtropical front. It is often the case that when eclipse points occur in the western Pacific, a planet approaching them will generate high-pressure values in the eastern Pacific. From this area the counterpoint to the trough, the ridge, is formed to balance the flow of the jet stream. The harmonics of these two lines are also explained in the previously mentioned harmonics of storms


Fig.6


Fig.6

In (fig 6) both the arctic front and the sub tropical front circles are depicted as well as the two disturbance zones (wedges). Also shown is a broad orange circular area that runs between the arctic front and the subtropical front. This area is called the polar front. It is the most active of the three fronts for the mixing of cold and warm air masses. It can be seen from the chart that ridges (red arrow) and troughs (blue arrow) alternate with each other in the region of the polar front. This is the prime weather maker in the northern hemisphere.

In Doc Weather these three frontal areas are integrated into a web of geometric lines that have proven through many years of experiments to be significant areas within the three fronts for the generation of north to south or meridional flow. Meridional flow arises as the major source of strong storm energies. In general, ridges block the west to east flow of air in the temperate regions of the polar front causing the jet stream to buckle into troughs. The accurate seasonal placement of a ridge or trough in a particular longitude is of the utmost importance for long-range prediction. To aid in this placement, Doc Weather uses a system of projection curves that have proved through many experiments to be reliable indicators of where the jet stream is most likely to shift into ridges within the polar front. These curves are harmonically and geometrically linked to the positions of the eclipse points and are accurate indicators of where north/south disturbance patterns of the jet stream are most likely to emerge in a given season. For this reason they are called jet curves in Doc Weather.


Fig.7


Fig.7
jet curves

In figure 7 a 45° jet curve is depicted as a green semi-circle around the solar eclipse point that centers on the point and then extends out to 45 degrees of arc. This curve is labeled as the 45° jet curve. A second semi-circle centered on the solar point is depicted in violet. This is the 72° jet curve. All of the other features are kept in this chart so the full geometry can be seen. Many instances have shown that in the places where the two jet curves cross the arctic front, polar front and sub tropical fronts (red sections of both curves) either strong trough formation or strong ridge formation is the result. The transformations of the jet stream happen when a planet either approaches (ridge building) or crosses (trough forming) the eclipse point. The placement of the red sections of the jet curves often determines the path of the jet stream as it steers around the blocks and troughs in the northern hemisphere.


Fig.8


Fig.8

In this chart the opposite set of jet curves from the reflex solar point is depicted and all other elements are deleted for clarity. The jet curves have been reduced to lines rather than bands on the chart. The important sections of the curves between the 90° and 144° lines are rendered in broad red lines. These areas are the places to watch for the transformation of the jet stream when planets are transiting eclipse points.


Fig.9


Fig.9

In this chart both eclipse points and both reflex points are shown generating two 45° jet curves and two 72° jet curves each. One set of 72° jet curves crosses in the eastern Pacific. In the area of their crossing they form a diamond shape. This is called the eclipse diamond in Doc Weather. This area (yellow) is a potent area to watch when planets are moving in the vicinity of the eclipse points.

In the vicinity of the eastern pair of eclipse points the lunar node is creating high pressure aspects against the lunar point. This influence is depicted by the blue H. By following the blue lines coming out of the eclipse point out to their respective jet curves to the west we can see a succession of curves across North America. First is a 22° curve to the east of the Antilles in the tropical Atlantic. The next jet curve is the 45° jet curve from the lunar point that is moving up the west coast of Florida into the Great Lakes region. We can see that there is a high here over the Ohio Valley that is supporting the formation of a ridge on the East Coast. This high is generated by the position of the lunar node in relationship to the eclipse point over the mid Atlantic. This placement of a high over the East Coast would make the weather there clear and warmer. The next jet curve from the lunar point is the 72° curve just off of the West Coast. It runs up the coast and is associated with a high over Idaho.

Going back to the two eclipse points in the mid Atlantic we can see that the solar reflex point is aspected to low pressure by the lunar node. The 22° jet curve from that point is over the Dominican Republic. The 45° jet curve from the solar reflex point is over the Midwest. The symbols for low pressure areas and their accompanying cold (triangles) and warm (bubbles) fronts are included so that the interface between the Doc Weather chart and the standard 500mb chart can be seen. Along the leading edges of the cold fronts surrounding both of these lows precipitation is most likely. The weather in the Midwest will be prone to rain because there is a trough there. The trough is being supported by the low-pressure value generated on the solar reflex point by the lunar node. The low over the Great Lakes is supporting the sagging of the trough over the Midwest as cold comes down from western Canada into the Midwest.

Farther west the high-pressure value on the 72° jet curve from the lunar point is combining with a high-pressure value on the 72° jet curve from the lunar reflex point over the mid Pacific to support the previously mentioned, strong ridge formation over Idaho. This ridge is pushing up the jet in the west bringing cold down into the Midwest enhancing the effects of the trough.

On the western side of the diamond (yellow) the two 72° jet curves from the solar and solar reflex points are aspected to low pressure. This is supporting a trough formation off of the West Coast that is bringing cold down from the Aleutians pressing a warm front against the coastal high and pushing the jet up into western Canada. If the ridge over Idaho held then the jet stream would guide the warm moisture in the trough northward into British Columbia. If the trough was more powerful than the ridge or the ridge was weakened suddenly the trough would come ashore in the west bringing storms into the PNW and Northern California.


Fig.10


Fig.10

In the last chart the node and Jupiter are shown having simultaneously moved in arc on the next day. The high and low pressure values on the eclipse points has reversed as a result of these movements. This move has shift the high and low-pressure values on the grid, and especially around the diamond and created a whole other set of potentials. High pressure is now over the Midwest and the eastern Pacific. This has created two troughs on the continent. One is over the Great Basin and the other is over the East Coast. The trough on the 45° jet curve over the East Coast shows cold coming down the slope of the high over the Midwest as a warmth surge makes its way off of the coast into the Western Atlantic. In the west a ridge over the eastern Gulf of Alaska has sent the jet stream into western Canada and is bringing cold down into the Great Basin. Ahead of the cold a warmth surge is making its way north into the northern Great Plains. A forecast for this chart would have storms in Denver or Minneapolis but clear in Kansas and Oklahoma. Farther east it would be rain in the lower Mississippi Valley and Ohio Valley with threat of storms for the mid Atlantic coast tomorrow.

The possibilities within these scenarios are endless. Especially when it is understood that with the next eclipse the whole grid may or may not shift as much as sixteen degrees to the west putting a whole other set of influences into the generic climate pattern for that season. In a case like that when the eclipse suddenly changed, the grid the climate pattern for the West Coast, Midwest and East Coast would be very different even though the two transiting planets were in the same positions. The dynamics created with a shift of the eclipse point placing the activity of the jet curves over different geographical areas is the fundamental concept in Doc Weather.

As planets approach and hit the various points in the chart the different curves are stimulated to low and high-pressure values. The placement of the curves in climatologically sensitive areas is of utmost importance. However, it sometimes happens that a series of planetary motion in arc events causes no reaction in the atmosphere at all. A critical eye might say that the model is flawed. It usually comes out of the case studies that if the series had unfolded a month previous the motions would have been the stimulus point for a strong storm due to the climatic shifts of the jet stream through the seasons. The planetary view always needs to be integrated to the demands of the climate regime for the season. When the two are brought into focus very accurate forecasts can be made far in advance.

Still, there are many events in climate studies that seem to defy the standard climatology. From the perspective of Doc Weather these unusual events almost always have an unusual planetary signature. Strong reversals of established patterns are most often coincident with the shifting of a jet curve as an eclipse changed the grid. When the new eclipse puts a new point into a particular area this often shifts established weather patterns from dry to wet and the reverse. When the shifting of the eclipse points is coincident with the transit of a planet across the new point, then drought patterns can change into flood patterns overnight and weather watchers are left scratching their heads. From the perspective of Doc Weather, the eclipse grid of jet curves and the insight that the eclipse change was coincident with a planetary transit across the new eclipse point is a case of right event happening in the right time frame at the right place. These kinds of movement events in time show up clearly in the system that is behind the forecasts in Doc Weather.