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The Basic Chart in Doc Weather explained. - 07.12.04


The basic chart in Doc Weather brings together current charts from the National Weather Service and planetary motion studies from Doc Weather's research. Learn the basic concepts of this approach in this article.

Linking the motions of the planets to specific climate events is the heart of the work in Doc Weather. In this article Doc Weather shares some insights into unusual weather patterns from the point of view of what could be called planetary geometries. The key to the charts in Doc Weather is that certain areas on the earth seem to respond to planetary motions in certain time frames This model uses advanced geometries to see into unusual weather patterns. The geometries are subtle but dependable.


Fig.1


Fig.1

The chart in (FIG 1) depicts the northern hemisphere divided into twelve equal sections of 30° each. Each section is further divided into intervals of 5°. This chart is the center of the system used in Doc Weather. It has been developed through many different forms over the past 24 years. On the chart an eclipse point is shown. This is the geodetic or precise geographical projection of the position of the eclipse point in the heavens. This is the reverse of the standard projection of a terrestrial position into the heavens that provides the basis for astronomy. The projection of the Zodiac onto Earth allows for a system to be designed in which celestial motions can be tracked in the motions of weather patterns.

In the Doc Weather charts, the position of the spring equinox at 23° Aries is projected down onto the earth at 0° longitude in Greenwich. This spreads the twelve 30° sections of the Zodiac across the equator in the form of the chart. From such a chart it is then possible to project the position of eclipses onto specific geographical locations and find the earthly equivalent to a planetary event. The placement of eclipses onto this chart is the most fundamental aspect of studying planetary events and linking them to climate changes.


Fig.2


Fig.2

As an experiment, if you were to look at a difax 500 mb level flow chart for the whole northern hemisphere on the day of an eclipse, the chances are that you might see centers of low pressure lining up in a straight line going through the polar regions. (FIG 2) The next thing would be to record the position in longitude of the low- pressure centers from the daily difax map onto the Doc Weather chart. This sounds more complicated than it is in reality. Simply print out a Doc Weather blank chart found in figure 1, Xerox a couple copies of it, and then when the eclipse happens transfer the positions of the lows on that day onto the Doc Weather chart. Most likely they will be a number of them organized into a straight line through the North Pole.

More often than not, there will be a noticeable line of low-pressure areas going near the North Pole depicted on the 500mb chart of the upper atmosphere. To continue the experiment wait for the two weeks until the next eclipse and see if a similar line drawn from the sidereal longitude of the new eclipse will also show some form of significant geometry in the placement of storms. Experiments like these have been undertaken for the past two decades and the weather patterns connected to planetary motions have proven many times to provide provocative insights into some of the most perplexing weather phenomena.


Fig.3


Fig.3

To see into these patterns, however, we need to expand the Doc Weather chart by adding two eclipse generated lines to create a field of what we could call eclipse disturbance zones. In (FIG 3) we can see a chart that has a blue circle and a pencil like zone filled in violet. These areas represent influences that can be expected to become disturbed whenever a planet moves near to the eclipse point to which the lines are linked. The eclipse point in this chart is in the longitude of Japan, at 0° Virgo. Through experiment it has been observed that if a planet, say Mars, was to cross the eclipse point there would almost certainly be a disturbance of the "jet stream":glossary in the Polar Regions. The broad blue circle is the polar front. It is a band of winds that circles the northern hemisphere between 50° N latitude and 60° N latitude. By drawing lines across the chart from the eclipse point to touch the upper zone of the polar front and the lower zone of the polar front a disturbance area can be seen (the violet pencil).

It has been observed that if an eclipse point were to be positioned at 0° Virgo and be disturbed by Mars or the Moon crossing it, the polar jet stream would breakout of the narrow zone bracketed by 50°N ands 60° N and loop to the south. Such a loop in the jet stream is known as a "meridional flow":glossary. It flows along the N to S meridians of longitude. This is depicted in fig 3 as a curved arrow. This type of pattern emerges in the polar front when a planet crosses the eclipse point. Climatologists call the pattern when the meridional flow creates a bowl shape that is open to the north, a trough. Troughs are the sites of strong storm or low- pressure events.


Fig.4


Fig.4

The opposite pattern, the block, arises when a planet has not crossed an eclipse point but is still approaching an eclipse point. The polar block is depicted in (fig 4) arising as Mars approaches the eclipse point over South East Asia. The block is the curved arrow running from south to north and back again in the eastern Pacific. A block generally rises from a southern latitude and moves north towards the polar front. It also runs meridionally. It has its origins in the tropics in what is known as the sub tropical front. The sub tropical front is the large blue circle in figure 4. The two lines that create the blue pencil shaped area are drawn from the eclipse point. They bracket the northern extent and southern extent of the subtropical front. It is often the case that when eclipse points occur in the western Pacific, a planet approaching them will generate high-pressure values in the eastern Pacific. From this area the counterpoint to the trough, the ridge, is formed to balance the flow of the jet stream.


Fig.5


Fig.5

In (fig 5) both the polar front and the sub tropical front circles are depicted as well as the two disturbance zones. Also shown is a yellow semi circle that centers on the eclipse point but extends from the eclipse point out to 45 degrees of arc. This circle is labeled as the 45° jet curve. Many instances have shown that where a 45° arc circle is drawn using the eclipse point as the center, the places where the circle crosses the polar and sub tropical fronts will be the site of either strong trough formation or strong ridge formation as the planet approaches (ridge building) or crosses (trough forming) the eclipse point. These centers are marked in the chart with pink circles. The troughs or ridges then stream eastward in the prevailing westerlies. The placement of the jet curves often determines the path of the jet stream that steers storms around the blocks and through the troughs


Fig.6


Fig.6

In fig 6 the "jet curves":glossary have been reduced to lines rather than bands on the chart.Two eclipse points are shown that generate two 45° jet curved in the central Pacific from eclipse points in the Central Pacific The area between the jet curves includes two pink circles where the jet curves cross the disturbance zones at the polar front and the sub tropical front. Since there are always two eclipses occurring in pairs, about 15° apart, there are two jet curves close to each other over the mid Pacific. Mars is depicted crossing the first eclipse point and the Moon is depicted crossing the second one on the same day. This is known as a "tandem transit":glossary in Doc Weather and is a sure sign that a strong trough will form between the jet curves on that day and a day afterwards.


Fig.7


Fig.7

A trough in the eastern Pacific most likely would stimulate some form of low-pressure against the West Coast. In fig 7 the eclipse points have been moved a bit farther to the east, bringing the two 45° jet curves into the East Pacific. In this position the same tandem motions of Mars and the Moon on the eclipse points would stimulate the same low-pressure trough. However, since the eclipse points were in a different position, the climate pattern for the West Coast would be very different even though the two transiting planets were in the same positions. This shift of the eclipse point placing the activity of the jet curves over different geographical areas is the fundamental concept in Doc Weather.


Fig.8


Fig.8

Fig 8 shows another set of jet curves at 72° from the eclipse point. These curves form a second wave of influence from one eclipse point. In the illustration it can be seen that a typical path of the jet stream across North America would follow the pattern of a double trough with a high-pressure area in between, if both eclipse points were being transited in tandem. This second set of jet curves arise at 72° and can be a useful tool for modeling "teleconnections":glossary between large air masses over long distances. In other sections of Doc Weather, examples will be given showing how complex planetary rhythms play themselves out over this grid system of sensitive standing waves in the atmosphere.


Fig.9


Fig.9

In the final image, fig 9, we see a complete set of jet curves for two eclipses. This is a typical chart used to do research in Doc Weather. As planets approach and hit the various points in the chart the different curves are stimulated to low and high-pressure values. The placement of the curves in climatologically sensitive areas is of utmost importance. It often happens that a series of planetary "motion in arc":glossary events causes no reaction in the atmosphere that just a year ago would have been the stimulus point for a strong storm. The different reactions are usually due to the fact that the placement of a curve over a particular area had shifted as the eclipses changed position. Often the major changing event in unusual climate patterns is the eclipse event itself. When the new eclipse puts a new point into a particular area this often shifts the weather patterns. When this eclipse point shift occurs just as a planet hits it in a transit, then a strong event is often the result. When the shifting of the eclipse points is coincident with the transit of a planet across the new point, then drought patterns can change into floods overnight and weather watchers are left scratching their heads. From the perspective of Doc Weather, the eclipse grid of jet curves and the insight that the eclipse change was coincident with a planetary transit across the new eclipse point is a case of right event happening in the right time frame at the right place. These kinds of events show up clearly in the system that is behind the forecasts in Doc Weather.