A note from the Doc: The references to planets and constellations on this site are not astrological in nature, merely the clearest way to reference these positions and angles. For more, please read: Astrology or Astronomy »

Reading the Outlook Charts - 08.17.04


This article describes some of the basic ideas in Doc Weather in order to help readers follow along with the predictions.

Outlook is a feature that provides many different forecasts of coming weather potentials a year in advance. It uses the charts and features of the techniques used on Doc Weather to predict probable storm tracks and blocking air mass patterns across the continental United States. The following charts describe the most fundamental features of the charts used in the Outlooks so that the reader can follow along with the unfolding patterns throughout the year.


Fig.1


Fig.1

In this first figure the positions of the eclipse points and their reflex points are illustrated. The reflex points are the positions that are exactly opposite the solar position on the day of either a lunar or solar eclipse. These points shift to the west with each eclipse. Each new position provides for the arising of a series of lines that form an eclipse grid that have proven to be effective in predicting the placement of highs and lows for the six month period between eclipses. On the first chart the two main eclipse lines are shown going from their respective eclipse points to the reflex points There is one line from the solar eclipse point going 180° to the solar reflex point and one line from the lunar eclipse point going 180° to the lunar reflex point. In the planetary flux model there is little difference considered between an eclipse point and an eclipse reflex point. They both have shown to have similar values and actions. The solar and lunar points to the east are known as the eastern pair and the solar and lunar points to the west are known as the western pair.


Fig.2


Fig.2

In this figure2 a set of jet curves have been added to the eastern pair of eclipse points. Jet curves are harmonic curves that describe particularly sensitive areas with regards to the position of an eclipse point. For more information about jet curves please see chart basics . The jet curves are placed over areas that can be expected to be problematic climatically with the current eclipse placement. In this chart we can also see that the lunar node lunar node is placed between the eclipse points. The lunar node has the quality of a planet in that it can seriously influence an eclipse point when it moves in arc . In this chart the motion of the node has placed a high-pressure value on to both of the eclipse points. To the west of the position of the points themselves the set of harmonic jet curves over the continent are showing the effects of that high-pressure influence in the formation of a high over the Maritime Provinces and another over the Pacific Northwest. The projection of jet curves from eclipse points across the northern hemisphere is the fundamental technique in Doc Weather. A planet or lunar node moving in arc near to an eclipse point has consistently been found to create troughs or blocks within harmonically distributed zones either to the east or west of the eclipse point. These disturbance zones are called jet curves . The placement of the jet curves in specific years is seen to determine the fundamental climatic scenarios for the season. Sometimes the jet curves are positioned over significant climatic areas and sometimes they are not. The forecasting technique involves comparing the placement of the jet curves for a particular time frame against the climatology of the particular area when either a high or low-pressure influence is present.

The different positions create potentials for many different climatic scenarios to emerge from these simple relationships. To activate the jet curves the motions of the planets or the node approaching or moving away from the eclipse points has been found to create counterpoint influences in the zones of the jet curves that then influence long-term weather events. In figure 2 the placement of high-pressure influences would cause us to expect that the Great Basin area of the west and the Northeast would be centers of high pressure with a potential for troughs to form in the upper Midwest between the highs.


Fig.3


Fig.3

In figure 3 the Jupiter is influencing the jet curves from the western pair of eclipse points. This image shows the situation when the influence from Jupiter would be for low-pressure rather than the high-pressure influence we saw from the node. In practice, either Jupiter or the node can produce either high or low-pressure on the jet curves. These influences shift and change rapidly in time and constitute a constantly shifting web of potentials in the atmosphere. In the chart we can see that Jupiter's influence on the eclipse points is creating a tendency for low-pressure over the Aleutians and also over the Great Basin. From this placement we might expect storms into the West Coast and Pacific Northwest as well.


Fig.4


Fig.4

In figure 4 we can see the crossing point of two of the 72° jet curves from the west and two of the 72° jet curves from the eastern pair. The jet curves that are crossing are placed at angles of arc of 72° from the eclipse point that generates them. They are 72° jet curves. They cross in the area that is the most turbulent and decisive area in any given chart since a planet influencing the western pair to one value and a planet influencing the eastern pair to the opposite value will generate these opposing values on their respective 72° jet curves. In Doc Weather this is known as the disturbance diamond. In the chart is it colored yellow. When trying to forecast climate patterns in a given year the position of the disturbance diamond is the single most important element in the system.

Also in this chart both the high and low- pressure areas coming from the opposite eclipse pairs are depicted. Of course these values could be reversed with the node creating low-pressure values on the eastern pair and Jupiter creating high-pressure values on the western pair. The different values of high and low-pressure can be understood by looking at the article planetary approach and retreat . The interesting part of this patterning is that the shift of values between the two planets might happen on the same day sending an established pattern that had been prevailing for a few weeks into a state of chaos. This type of event is the truly fascinating element in following the shifts in climate patterns with the help of Doc Weather.In this sample chart the disturbance diamond is over the West Coast. This placement would signal a strong patterning of the PNA (Pacific North America) climate pattern in this year. See N american climate patterns in Doc Weather basics.

When working with the eclipse grid one or two planets normally dominate the space around one or the other eclipse pair. The jet curve from each pair then become the dominant areas to watch when planets begin to move in arc in sequences in a given season. The eastern and western pairs of eclipse points respond to motions of planets approaching them and moving away from them. These responses are recorded on 45° and 72° jet curves that are resonant areas that are remote from the eclipse points but are linked to them harmonically. The planetary motions around these jet curve zones and their accompanying values of high and low-pressure then interact with the fundamental climatic scenario for that season in that locale. In Doc Weather these patterns are then compared to analog years when the eclipse points were in similar positions and a forecast is made based on the unusual weather patterns of the analog year.