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A strong planetary pattern is responsible for an unusual weather year. - 03.18.05


An archetypal planetary pattern is linked to19 snow events in New England and floods in southern California this year.

The citizens of the Northeast have been subjected to a record number of snow events this winter. This trend was predicted by Doc Weather in an earlier article . On the West Coast this has been a banner year for rain and snow in southern California. This wetness pattern was described in the article on Mars declination in an earlier Doc Weather article. This article tries to place both of these unusual events into the context of archetypal North American climate patterns that were stimulated by precise placements of jet curves this year across the eclipse grid in North America.


Fig.1


Fig.1

In figure 1 the jet curves for the most western portion of the most common pattern this year are depicted. The 45° jet curves over the Gulf of Alaska are aspected by Jupiter to a split between high-pressure to the west (blue curve) and low-pressure to the east (red curve). This pattern brings down the jet stream in the eastern Pacific in the vicinity of Hawaii as the jet drops between the high-pressure jet curve and the low-pressure jet curve (blue arrow). The alternation of high-pressure and low-pressure on the successive jet curves is what gives the chart this winter its particular dynamic. To see this implications of this alternating type of dynamic it is necessary to place high and low-pressure values on the appropriate jet curves. The sequences of jet curve lines that unfolded most often will be presented in the following charts.

The red jet curves support low-pressure and the blue jet curves support high-pressure. The names of the planets influencing the jet curves are included near the proper longitudes and the arrows coming from them represent the angular aspects that are stimulating the high and low-pressure areas on the jet curves. Only two 45° jet curves are shown in figure 1 but, in the full chart there are three sets of curves from each point; one at 22°, one at 45° and one at 72°. The complete set will be shown in figure 5. Whichever of these three jet curves are active in a particular time frame determines the quality of the blocks and troughs in the chart. The dominant jet curve in a given time frame is described in the text of the article in context of the climate pattern linked to it. There are four eclipse points that are generating these curves; the lunar point, the lunar reflex at 180°, the solar point and the solar reflex at 180°. These will be shown in figure 5. Further descriptions of these are found in the Doc Weather basics sections.


Fig.2


Fig.2

In figure 2 the pattern of high-pressure to the west and low-pressure to the east that we saw on the 45° jet curves over the Gulf of Alaska, is continued. Added to these curves are two 72° jet curves over the Great Basin. These curves are linked to the same eclipse points as the two 45° jet curves in figure 1. The western 72° jet curve is aspected to high-pressure by Jupiter (blue curve). This puts a high-pressure area across the top of Baja California in the south and the curve continues to the northeast crossing the Great Basin. The eastern 72° jet curve from the western pair is linked to the point that is aspected to low-pressure by Jupiter (red curve). This jet curve crosses the southern tip of the Baja peninsula and continues northeast towards Hudson Bay. This type of pattern most often resulted in a split jet stream this winter. The two arrows in fig. 2 show one part of the jet moving to the south around a high over the West Coast and another weaker leg of the polar jet moving across the northern tier of states as it travels along the southern border of a low stationed over Hudson Bay.


Fig.3


Fig.3

Figure 3 shows how the two 72° jet curves from the western pair of eclipse points illustrated in figure 2 are crossed by the 72° jet curves from the eastern pair of points. In the winter of 2005 the crossing forms a diamond over the South West. For most of the winter the motion of the lunar node has influenced the two eastern eclipse points and by projection the jet curves associated with them. The most prominent pattern has been that the western most 72° jet curve from the eastern pair of points has been aspected to high-pressure for long periods of time (blue curve) while the eastern most 72° jet curve from the eastern pair of points has been aspected to low-pressure for most of the time (red curve). This pattern is just a peculiarity of this particular time frame this season.

All four 72° jet curves taken together form an eclipse diamond from their crossing. In figure three we can see that these relationships put the two 72° jet curves on the western side of the eclipse diamond under high pressure and the two 72° jet curves on the eastern side of the eclipse diamond under low pressure. This is very significant in this chart and it was a very persistent pattern for a long time this winter. It put a strong block over the west and a trough formation over the South West and the southern High Plains. This pattern allowed storms coming from southern California to pass over the mountains and reform over the middle of the continent. From there the usual track was across the Gulf coast and then up into New England. It also allowed the storm track in the west to form an unusual looping jet called an omega pattern by climatologists.

Figure 3 shows an omega pattern over the western states this winter. The 45° jet curves over the Gulf of Alaska bring down a low in the center of the Gulf of Alaska. The low-latitude low then encounters high- pressure coming from the two 72° jet curves on the western side of the eclipse diamond. One leg of these two crossing jet curves extends into the southern part of the East Pacific. The high associated with this jet curve often pushed northward along the coastal mountains and snaked into the western Great Basin to meet the northern leg of the other 72° jet curve in the PNW. With this surge of high-pressure to the north that linked the two 72° jet curves on the western side of the diamond, the low to the west over the middle of the Gulf of Alaska, dug south. The low in the middle of the Gulf of Alaska and the low of the coast of Southern California were locked in place by the long vertical blocking ridge along the western mountains. These relationships set up the omega pattern. In it the jet stream was directed by the strong high that was fixed over Vancouver Island. The jet stream surged to the north along around the high and then plummeted south around the northern side of the block over Vancouver Island.

Starting in the west and looking at the complete pattern, the jet stream moved north along a high pressure jet curve in the longitude of the Aleutian Islands. Then it moved south in the longitude of Hawaii along a low pressure 45° jet curve, then it veered north and east into western Canada. From there the high-pressure steered the jet once more to the south along the west Coast. Running south it turned east in the vicinity of Southern California. The whole motion formed a horseshoe or omega. This omega was the western formation of a very common climatic pattern that unfolded this winter. It could be seen in many daily charts at the 500mb level that a persistent high was centered just to the north of the crossing point of the two high-pressure 72° jet curves over the west. This pattern brought much rain to the south and dryness to the PNW.


Fig.4


Fig.4

In figure 4 the 45° and 22° jet curve lines for the eastern pair of eclipses are included in the chart. It can be seen that the western most 45° jet curve of the eastern pair is influenced to high-pressure values (blue). This curve supported a low latitude ridge off of the east coast in the vicinity of Bermuda. The eastern most 45° jet curve (red or low- pressure) is placed with its northern tip towards the Maritime Provinces. This placement supported the emergence of a low-pressure area linked to the Hudson Bay low, a seasonal feature of the winter northern hemisphere climate. The Hudson Bay low is represented by a large L over Hudson Bay. It can be seen that the Hudson Bay low is at the tip of the most easterly of the two 72° jet curves from the western pair of eclipse points. A strong low here dominated the continental regime. This teamed up with the off shore low-pressure area south of the Maritimes to enhance storm activity in the northeast. This pattern is represented by the trough formation over the Northeast.

The 22° jet curve in the mid Atlantic is aspected to high-pressure (blue). This high persistently linked to the high off of Bermuda creating a blocking pattern (blue horseshoe) that prevented the storm jet across the continent from exiting North America easily. The result was a persistent trough formation with a block to the south in the western Atlantic and a block at high latitudes in the mid Atlantic. These jet curve aspects were persistent as a result of unusual motions of the lunar node aspecting the eastern eclipse points during the winter months.

In theory the high-pressure 45° jet curve from Bermuda to the Maritimes should have formed a ridge right against the coast because it was aspected by the node to high-pressure for long periods of time. In reality a ridge along a line in that position rarely raises up to block the East Coast. More often a low latitude block on the East Coast will form due to the standard climatic patterning of that area. In order for a blocking ridge to form in such a way that the block brings dryness to the East Coast, the ridge needs to build up from the Mississippi Valley and then drift to the east. This would happen if the 45° high-pressure jet curve were closer to the coast or even going across the Gulf of Mexico. In this chart this high-pressure jet curve is too far to the east to build up against the coast. The result is that the block forms farther out to sea.

What happened often in the winter of 2005 was that when this curve was aspected to high-pressure the ridge built up in the western Atlantic at a low latitude and then drifted east to connect to the 22° jet curve over the central Atlantic. When the two connected a strong ridge built up there over the Azores. This is an archetypally placed high-pressure area known as the Azores High. From there the high would meander back towards the west at a high latitude and block from the tip of Greenland . In the chart the horseshoe shaped high over the Atlantic is the beginning of the blocking pattern. When that happened the low-pressure 45° jet curve that pointed to the eastern tip of the Maritimes was the site of a strongly sagging low-pressure trough that was fed from the Hudson Bay low, another archetypal climatic feature of the northern hemisphere winter.

In response to the central Atlantic high latitude ridge and the western Atlantic low latitude ridge the continental jet stream coming in from the southwest tracked across Texas and then across the Midwest bringing much rain and cold. The low latitude high in the western Atlantic then nudged the fronts into the northeast and abundant snows in New England were the result. The small arrow moving up the coast towards New England represents this track. The source of the fronts that energized these storms was the counter clockwise circulation around the low over Hudson Bay.

The Hudson Bay low and the Azores high are climatic counterpoints that most often result in the blocking high over the Atlantic moving into Greenland. This happens when both features are strong in a given year. In the winter just past, the Hudson Bay low was very strong since it was sitting at the top of the 72° jet curve over the Pacific. The motions of Jupiter often influenced this curve to low-pressure values. The Hudson Bay low anchored on the top of this jet curve and reigned supreme in the record snowy winter for the Northeast. Taken together, the placements of the jet curves and their typical values models the unusual conditions of this winter with a thought provoking precision.


Fig.5


Fig.5

The last figure summarizes the previous charts from the perspective of the whole northern hemisphere. By simply reading the sequences of high and low pressure areas in the chart, we can get some insight into the rhythmic potency of this pattern. Starting with a high near Hawaii and moving east we can see a low then two highs then two lows then a high and a low and finally another high. It is interesting to note that in this year, these placements were in line with strong archetypal features of the Northern Hemisphere. Also the particular rhythms of Jupiter and the lunar node on the field of the jet curves supported the archetypal climatic patterns in very potent ways. Jupiter often is instrumental in the formation of long periods of blocking. The red spot on Jupiter is an image of this tendency. The node is constantly fluctuating in direct and retrograde motions bringing a strong dynamic for change and turbulence in its rhythms. Together these two influences made for an archetypally strong winter pattern with more on the way in spring.