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Jet Curves - 07.14.04


Doc Weather uses jet curves to predict where the disturbance areas in a season will be. With this article you will get insight into these techniques.


Fig.1


Fig.1

When an eclipse occurs, it is possible to project the longitude of that celestial event onto the longitude of the earth. The technique for doing this is known as geodetic projection and can be accomplished by projecting Greenwich (0°) longitude onto a northern hemisphere polar map (figure 1) at 23° Aries. This forms a band of longitudinal sections placed at 30° intervals along the equator. These divisions are linked to the Zodiac. Through observations over many years this Zodiacal projection has proved to be effective in tracking the positions of planets moving in front of the Zodiac and referring these motions in arc to specific terrestrial areas. To project a planetary position onto the earth in this way is known as geodetic projection. Using this technique as the foundation for constructing a north pole projection chart a further projection can be made by projecting the celestial position in longitude of an eclipse onto the earth. This projection is used as the originating or seed point of a whole web of harmonic lines that can be used to track climatic phenomena.


Fig.2


Fig.2

If a compass is set with one end on an eclipse point on the equator, and the other end set on 72° degrees of arc from the eclipse point and a circle is drawn over the earth that passes through the equator and touches the arctic and antarctic circles, one part of that circle will form a curve that will describe a latitudinal meridian(north/south line)originating from a specific longitudinal position on the equator. In figure 2 we can see a picture of how this might be imagined from the perspective of extending the eclipse point out into space. If the eclipse point in space is imagined as the center of a conical field of energies like a radio signal from a transmission tower, then the earth will be the focus of the cone like field. In reality the signal from the point as a transmitter would be spherical. But the earth would experience its part of the spherical field as a cone as it intercepts the spherical signal. In figure 2 the eclipse point and cone are labeled appropriately. If the field is multi phased, having multiple frequencies in it, then there would be certain nodal points in the field that would be places where the signal would be stronger.

Using a clue from Johannes Kepler regarding the significance of 45° and 72° degree angles, we have drawn a 45° cone within a 72° cone as an image of the field properties of the cone where it intersects the sphere of the earth. The 45° curve is, for Kepler, the equivalent of the sounding of the musical note of the second above the fundmental in the harmony of the spheres and the 72° angle is the equivalent of the sounding of the third above the fundamental. We could say that if there was a signal cone coming from the eclipse point in the heavens that we could expect that there would be two disturbance zones on the earth where the signal would sound with maximum resonance. Those two areas would be along the 45° and 72° circles where the signal cone intersected the surface of the earth. We could imagine standing waves of energies at these curves of the circles.


Fig.3


Fig.3

In figure 3 this concept is depicted in two dimensions drawn over a north pole projection map of the northern hemisphere. The eclipse point at 0° Libra is seen to be generating two angles along the arc of the equator. One is 45° of arc and the other is 72° of arc from the eclipse point. In practice these two angles and their resultant projection curves have proven to be very effective in predicting the position of the polar and tropical jet streams in a given time frame. In the "planetary flux model":planetaryfluxmodel these two projection curves are known as jet curves and they can be used as a significant indicator of the activity of the jet stream in a given year. Over many years it has been observed that in a given winter the polar jet tends to track along these curves when forming blocks, which are stable high pressure ridges of air. As a result, the position of the eclipse point in a particular year can give indications of where blocks of high pressure are most likely to form in the westerlies. If you can identify the position and duration of the blocking episodes the door to understanding and predicting climate shift is opened.


Fig.4


Fig.4

In general, cold air tends to flow down the east side of a block due to the clockwise circulation in the block. This is illustrated in figure 4. In the drawing the blocks are labeled H for high pressure and the gray ribbon snaking through the atmosphere between the blocks is the jet stream that is flowing from west to east. Where the jet rounds across the top of a block cold air is being brought down from the north into the south. This is the source of freezing weather to the south in temperate regions.


Fig.5


Fig.5

The concept in this essay that is central to the understanding of blocking patterns is the observation that the position of the eclipse point generates jet curves enabling the polar jet to drop cold into specific longitudes. Further, this positioning in semi-decadal(4.5 yr.) and decadal(9.5yrs.) periods can be predicted by noting the retrograde motion of the eclipse points through the zodiac. To simplify this process, a particular eclipse point and its two jet curves will be thought of as a unit.

In an actual chart the position opposite the eclipse point, whether it be a lunar or solar eclipse is also considered to generate its own set of jet curves. The jet curves interlock in a V pattern. The eclipse V is often a source of strong climatological forces. The placement of this V and the two jet curves from one eclipse point is the fundamental form of this work. Such a chart is depicted in figure 5.


Fig.6


Fig.6

Past observations have shown that when the 45° jet curve from an eclipse point is situated over the Atlantic Ocean then there is a tendency for blocks to occur near Greenland or to diminish the influence of the Hudson Bay Low in winter. In figure 6 the positions of the eclipse points in the nine greatest unusual Greenland block patterns is depicted. This is known to climatology as a negative NAO pattern. NAO stands for North Atlantic Oscillation. When the -NAO pattern is dominant a strong block forms over Greenland and serves to push the continental jet stream south out of the Canadian Plains into the east Coast. Using the teleconnection index issued by NOAA the plot was made for the eclipse positions during that year. Three years , March '534, March '62 and December 98 had eclipse lines crossing the east coast in a north to south pattern. One year, December 65, had the 72° line from the eclipse point as the significant line crossing the East Coast from north to south. The five eclipse positions left were within 25° of longitude. These eclipse points were spread over a 45 year period. In all cases the -NOA index was significant.

This coincidence over half a century of the position of eclipse points and the rhythmic occurrence of the Greenland Block provides much food for thought about interdecadal rhythms and their prediction in climatological modeling.