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Doc Weather planetary climate gazette. - 12.19.05


Doc Weather links the upcoming planetary events with likely climate patterns for winter and spring of 2006.


Fig.1


Fig.1

In January 2006 at mid-month watch for strong polar breakouts in the Great Basin and the High Plains as Mercury moving direct crosses Venus moving retrograde close to the disturbance diamond. There should be a turbulent week or so between the 18th and the 23rd for the High Plains.

In February 2006, Venus, moving retrograde onto station near to the disturbance diamond will create a split value pattern over the eastern Pacific. Look for a surge and drift pattern to put high-pressure at a high latitude in the Gulf of Alaska in the first week. This will most likely push the storm jet there to the south bringing storms into the West Coast and PNW.


Fig.2


Fig.2

March is the month for the eclipses this spring. The shift will put the disturbance diamond off of the West Coast and the two 45° jet curves over the Midwest. (figure2) March 2006 is also a month of many stations among the planets. In early March Jupiter is on station in the mid Pacific. This influence is likely to stimulate strong zonal flow across the US. On the 14th the lunar eclipse puts a new point over Southeast Asia, on the 28th a point will be placed over Japan. The node in Pisces, Pluto in Sagittarius and Mercury in Aquarius will all be on station during the time between the two eclipses. This cluster of events should gradually build to an unusually strong storm impulse across most of the US for the last five days of the month.

In April the node goes off station on the 1st and Pluto goes off station on the 5th, while Saturn goes on station on the 2nd. Saturn, moving through Cancer over east Asia will become a significant influence this year as the nodal cycle brings the eclipse points into its vicinity. Watch the Gulf of Alaska and the PNW for strong shifts in values from the 2nd to the 9th as a turbulent storm period gradually winds down. Look for zonal flow from the PNW into the northern tier. The remainder of April is relatively free of disturbance clusters except for the last few days of the month.

Early May is a benign period with very little disturbance energies from planetary motion. General zonal flow and weak frontal passages should be the quality of any precipitation events. Later in the month, Neptune goes on station retrograde from the 19th to the 26th. It will promote intermittent flow from the eastern eclipse points bringing cooler than average temps and moderate but persistent moisture to the eastern third of the country as a general pattern for the last two weeks of May.

In June the tropical high-pressure areas build northward pushing the storm jet into Canada. In June 2006, this should happen early with a rather calm period in the first two weeks. On the 14th, Uranus goes onto retrograde station until the 25th. This should be a significant weather maker for the Midwest since no other planet is moving during this whole station and Uranus is very close to the eclipse points over the Atlantic. Significantly, strong low pressure values on the eastern pair of eclipse points is a signal for persistent low pressure systems to enter the lower Mississippi Valley for the eleven days from mid-month until the end of June. A block over the PNW and intermittent signals for the Intermountain west should support a period of persistent, but moderate rains in the southeastern parts of the Corn Belt in the last two weeks of June.