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Things to Look for in 2005 - 07.17.04


Looking for weather changes with Doc Weather in 2005, these significant times bear close watching.

This section is aimed at helping readers to enter more deeply into the mysteries of the relationships between the motions of the cosmos and the sensitive climatic zones of the earth on a daily basis. To use this feature most effectively please read through the section on Using the Outlook Charts as an aid to understanding the dominant motions of Jupiter and the lunar node throughout the year 2005. This section is pithy but it is where the action is.


Fig.1


Fig.1

Early in 2005 the eclipse grid is set up like the chart in figure 1. Jupiter is influencing the western pair of eclipse points and the node is influencing the eastern pairsee basic flux chart . With Jupiter in the west sitting between the western pair of eclipse points, the motion in arc events of that planet will manifest in the eastern Pacific and the High Plains. The eastern Pacific is the site of the 45° jet curves from the western pair and the High Plains is the site of the 72° jet curves from the western pair. The 45° jet curves from the eastern pair will respond when the node moves in arc. The high and low-pressure responses from these motions will be observable in the Maritime Provinces. The 72° jet curves from the eastern pair will be observable in the High Plains area along with the 72° jet curves from the western pair. Along with these 72° centered over the High Plains and the eastern sections of the Rockies planets transiting the polar 90 points will also mitigate patterns over the High Plains.

With the 45° jet curves from the western pair of eclipse points centered over the western Gulf of Alaska, this will most likely be the preferred tracking line for storms out of the Bering Sea when low pressure dominates the western pair. By contrast, when high-pressure dominates the western pair we can expect that the resulting ridge will push up into Alaska and press the jet stream south into California. This suggests colder than usual temperatures in the winter months south of Mt. Shasta until the eclipse shift in April. This climatic pattern is also supported by the 72° eclipse curves from the eastern pair. High-pressure on the eastern pair from a nodal motion in arc should manifest as the tendency for strong surging high-pressure areas to shoot north along the Canadian Rockies pushing high-pressure masses into western Canada and turning the jet stream on the West Coast to the south. These patterns suggest a cooler than normal winter for the West Coast with storms running down the coast unchecked from the Gulf of Alaska. Last year the 45° jet curves were up against the coast and shunted many storms to the east before they could drop south along the coast. As a result very dry conditions developed south of Grants Pass. That should be different this year.

The 45° jet curves from the eastern pair that are dominated by the motions of the lunar node are centered over the tip of the Maritime Provinces. Any high-pressure here should effectively block cold air from exiting the continent. This suggests that the pattern known as the Greenland block will be active bringing down cold air into the East Coast cities when the node supports high-pressure on the eastern pair. Early in the year the dominant factor should be the placement of the polar 90 lines over the Great Basin area. This is a factor since first Mercury and Venus moving in tandem cross this area in late January followed by a crossing of this area by Mars in early March. When planets cross this turbulent area there is most often a breakout of cold forces from the north accompanied by a more southerly placed jet stream in the longitude between the two polar 90 lines. This should make for a memorable winter in mid continent early in 2005.To find out how high and low-pressure values arise on the points see the article planet approach and retreat .


Fig.2


Fig.2

In mid April there are two eclipses but due to a peculiarity in the rhythms of eclipses this set will only shift position 1° of arc. This happens just before a strong shift is about to take place. Normally the points shift about 14° each time there is an eclipse. To most eyes this is the same chart as the first chart. However in April the cluster of Mars and Venus has moved on to approach mode for the eastern pair of eclipse points. Jupiter is still a factor on the western pair and the node is still dominant on the eastern pair. The seasonal difference is that the Pacific 45° jet curves are not effective in generating storm energies for the continent. The pattern that helps rains in mid continent is a strong monsoon from the Gulf of Mexico. On this chart this will be aided by high-pressure values arising on the eastern pair when the node moves in arc to support high pressure. This will draw in the Bermuda High and the circulation around that feature will bring good moisture up into the Midwest. This looks to be a strong factor in the month of July. This is something that might be noted by those who are interested in the soybean and corn crops. It is also interesting to note that the 72° jet curves from the eastern pair are situated over the Pacific Northwest. A high-pressure impulse on the eastern pair from the node in July 2005 looks like it will also support high-pressure in the PNW. A ridge there most often drives north into western Canada and brings down cold air into the Midwest even in the summer. During July 2005 it looks as if there will be cold from the north due to the placement of the 72° jet curves from the eastern pair and the Bermuda High stimulation of the Gulf Coast monsoon current. This looks wet for July of 2005 in the Corn Belt.


Fig.3


Fig.3

In October 2005 there is another set of eclipses that push the eclipse grid to the west by about 11° of arc. This shift puts the polar 90 lines and the nexus of the 72° jet curves squarely over the inter mountain area. The 45° jet curves from the western pair are shifted into the longitude of the Aleutian Islands. The 45° jet curves from the eastern pair are brought onto the continent to bracket the eastern seaboard. These shifts should create the climatic pattern for the fall and early winter. This shift puts the eastern and western jet curves over different areas of the continent and places the turbulent polar 90 zone over the intermountain areas. The Jupiter and nodal influences should be still dominant on the respective western and eastern pairs of eclipse points. The patterns point to October weather that is variable but not severe. Primarily a zonal flow pattern from the Pacific Northwest into the northern states should bring some early precipitation to the Northeast. In mid November look for a change as both Jupiter and the lunar node shift values to high pressure on the entire grid. The cold should fade after about a week and then not return until the first week of December. This should be short lived giving way to milder patterns until Christmas. This should make for a mild fall for most of the nation.