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Inter-Mountain High Plains Outlook 2005 - 07.12.04


A twelve- month forecast of the significant weather events of 2005 for the Inter-Mountain and High Plains regions.

In order that you have the maximum satisfaction using the outlook section of Doc Weather it is useful to refer to the article Using the Outlooks that gives indications about some of the features of this section. If you do this before going into the outlooks and also look in the feature things to look for to find more information about the charts for the year 2005 your reading pleasure will be greatly enhanced.


Fig.1


Fig.1

Figure 1 shows the jet stream being pushed far to the north by high-pressure areas on the continent. The jet then drops into the Midwest and the Northeast bringing weather into those areas. Doc Weather feels that this is going to be a dominant pattern this coming year.

The chart also shows why this forecast is being made. It contains a geometric set of curves known in Doc Weather as jet curves . These harmonious looking jet curves come from both the eastern and western pair of eclipse points. In the chart these jet curves are depicted as having a high- pressure value on them. Jupiter in the west and the node in the east should dominate these curves. When both are set to high pressure then expect a strong high to grow in the vicinity of the 72° jet curves from each set of eclipse points.The chart in figure 1 shows how the jet stream should respond when high-pressure dominates both sets of jet curves.

The 72° jet curves cross each other over the Great Basin. The image shows that when Jupiter and the node are working together to produce high pressure on the jet curves we should look for frigid temperatures in the eastern third of the country this winter.


Fig.2


Fig.2

This second image shows the resulting pattern when the eastern and western pairs of eclipse points are influenced towards low pressure simultaneously. Then the polar jet stream moves horizontally across the continent bringing milder weather farther south but enhancing the production of snow in the Great Lakes area and the Northeast. These two patterns should be the major storm patterns this winter as the eclipse positions put the crossing point of the 72° jet curves over the Great Basin. With this as a background let's look at a long term forecast for the Inter-Mountain and High Plains region as seen by Doc Weather for 2005.

Look for a stormy beginning of the year with snow during the first three weeks culminating in a blizzard at the end of January. An unusual split combination of jet curves from the eastern and western pair of eclipse points that crosses over Denver should be the center of the action at this time. This is supported both by Jupiter in the west and the node in the east. The turbulence in the intermountain areas should peak in the last week of January as both Mercury and Venus approach the polar 90 points in tandem from the west. Expect strong cold in the mountains in the first week of February from a strong coastal high in Alaska. Jupiter and the node are working together on this one. Then watch for clearing and gradually milder temperatures through the month, especially in the south. Watch for a dominating pattern of mildness to the south and a horizontal storm jet across the north. A series of intermittent values on both the eastern and western pair of points should support milder conditions for a while. Variable weather continuing into early in March should then lead to strong storms at mid-month as the node in the east, Jupiter in the west and Mars approaching the polar 90 points become active in the support of turbulence. A return to mild weather with high pressure over the western states and a strong cold storm should unfold at the end of the month as these aspects diminish. April should begin with warmer and drier weather to the south with weak to moderate fronts to the north. An April eclipse will shift the eclipse grid ever so slightly to the west, directly over the intermountain areas. The shift occurs in the the center of a cluster of Mercury, the node and Venus. As these planets rapidly shift aspects as they transit the polar 90 points late in the month, look for a set of storms in the mountains. May should bring warm and dry weather to the south with the storm jet moving horizontally from the Dakotas to the Great Lakes for week 2 and 3, and dry and warmer conditions north and south in the last week. Counter pointed low pressure movements by both Jupiter and the node should keep the weather unsettled at midmonth. June should be dominated by a pattern where the south is settled, warm and dry and the north has intermittent moderate fronts moving horizontally across the Dakotas about once every week. July should see this intermittent pattern dry up in the first week as a Jupiter motion on the western pair of eclipse points supports high pressure over the northwest. Look for moderate rains to resume through midmonth with a strong storm in the last week. Thunderstorms through the Dakotas and south High Plains should arise at mid-month and again at the beginning of the third week and again at month's end. Settled weather should dominate September until week 3 when moderate fronts pass to the north and then repeat this pattern again at month's end. October looks mostly dry with warming trends at mid-month. Cooling in November with strong storms in the third week signals the beginning of storm season. Early in week 1 of December look for a strong, cold storm from the Dakotas to Kansas. Watch for warming late in the second week. Late rains in the last week lead to the New Year.