A note from the Doc: The references to planets and constellations on this site are not astrological in nature, merely the clearest way to reference these positions and angles. For more, please read: Astrology or Astronomy »

The Hurricane Highway - 09.02.05


An unusual rhythm in eclipse patterns supports two years of storms into the Southeast.



Fig.1


Fig.1

The paths of hurricanes in the past two years have shown an unerring accuracy for moving into the Gulf of Mexico and then steering north as if there were some kind of hurricane highway. In fact with both hurricane Dennis and Katrina the point of maximum intensity and growth into superstorms has been at 86° W longitude or just to the west of the west coast of Florida. This is depicted in the first figure as the green line running north off of the Gulf coast of Florida. In the first figure it can be seen that the lunar and solar eclipse points are off of the west coast of Africa. This puts the 45°jet curves from those points over the western Atlantic and the 72° jet curves from those points over the Great Basin. Between those points the lunar node is situated in a position that can create strong influences when it is locked in blocking aspects to the eclipse points. The chart depicts the result of such blocking. The high on the two 45° jet curves is over Bermuda and the high from the 72° jet curves is over the western Gulf of Mexico. This forms a kind of highway up into the Midwest for storm coming in from the west. The paths of Dennis and Katrina can be seen to slip between the highs as the storms try to establish their archetypal parabolic curve to the north. Both of these storms used the continental route as the door to the north with both passing through the Ohio Valley as they tracked to the northeast.


Fig.2


Fig.2

Last year there were conditions that supported similar passage to the north for storms in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea. The placement of eclipse points and jet curves for the hurricane season in 2004 can be seen in figure 2. An unusual element in the time between last year and the current year is what could be called the short cycle of the eclipse points. Every five year or so, the regular motion of the eclipse points moving through the Zodiac comes to a halt. Normally the eclipse points shift between 14° and 16° every six months. Then, for one cycle, the eclipse points only move only a few degrees or not even move at all. This non-moving period is then followed by a strong 30° longitudinal motion of one set of points, and then the cycle of regular movements begins again. During the time of the compressed motion the eclipse points come very close to staying in one place for about a year. That is the case with the points between 2004 and 2005. As can be seen by comparing the two charts there was very little forward motion of the points between last hurricane season and this one. This is about to shift with the upcoming October eclipse. But for now the placement of 45° jet curves near Bermuda and the placement of 72° jet curves over the western Gulf of Mexico has created a serious highway for storms transiting the western Atlantic when the node creates high pressure on the eclipse points. In normal years this influence would not be similar in the year following a strong hurricane period. Unfortunately, due to this unusual rhythm in the placement of the eclipse points the Southeast has been the preferred path for severe storms for two very active hurricane seasons.