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Hurricanes 1995 - 2005 - 09.28.05


The decadal rhythm of two similar hurricane seasons points to the movement of the eclipse points.



Fig.1


Fig.1

It is noteworthy that the rash of hurricanes this year has a counterpart in the remarkable hurricane year 1995. In that year there were 19 named storms. This year, with a month or more to go there have been 19 named storms. The patterns for the storm tracks this year are also similar to the storm tracks in 1995. In figure 1, the different pressure zones are indicated by the colored areas. The light green areas represent slightly above normal pressure. The warm areas represent significantly above normal pressures. The darker the warmth the more the high pressure was above normal. Blue areas designate abnormally low pressure. The red arrows represent the most prevalent storm tracks for hurricanes during the hurricane season of 1995. The light gray curved lines are the eclipse grid for that year. The dark red lines in the eclipse grid are the 45° jet curves from the eastern pair of eclipse points that were active in the formation of the high- pressure.

One set of hurricane tracks (red arrow) is in the Gulf of Mexico and the other track is in the western Atlantic east of Bermuda. Between the two tracks a strong high centered in the Maritime Provinces dominated the eastern third of the nation. The hurricane tracks moved to the west and to the east of this high. It can be seen from figure 1 that the high is centered on the 45° jet curves from both the lunar point at 29° Pisces and the solar point from 13° Aries. This 45° jet curve zone is depicted by the strong red lines running south to north from the tropics to the Maritimes. The placement of this high kept the tropical tracking patterns of storms running horizontally from the mid Atlantic to the Caribbean and into the Gulf of Mexico most of the year. The high- pressure zone represents the anomalous high- pressure area for the months of June through October in 1995. The charts in figure 1 and 2 are adaptations of charts from the National Climatic Data Center. In 1995 the tropical storm track for hurricanes was dominated by this high-pressure area found at high latitudes. Saturn was active in aspecting the lunar and solar eclipse points to high-pressure throughout the hurricane season. This allowed the high to build up and maintain itself for long periods of time. This resulted in an unusually productive tropical activity.


Fig.2


Fig.2

In figure 2 the situation for the early hurricane season for 2005 is depicted. The same type of chart features found the first chart, are also included in this chart. It can be seen quite readily that the chart ten years later is very close to the chart in 1995. The strong high in the Maritime Provinces is once again forcing the tropical jet to avoid an area off of the coast and to either turn the storms into the mid Atlantic or into the Gulf of Mexico. The red arrows show the paths of the majority of the 19 named storms. The only storm that didn't follow this pattern was Ophelia. This storm got caught against the coast and ran up the 45° jet curve from the solar point. All of the other numerous storms were influenced by the placement of high-pressure at high latitudes on the East Coast. By comparing the eclipse points of the two charts it can be seen that the eclipse points in 2005 are within a few degrees of where they were in 1995. These two years are years of record amounts of hurricanes. As it was stated earlier, in 1995 Saturn was active on the eclipse points over the eastern Atlantic. In 2005 the lunar node has been very active in the area near to the points. In both years the patterns have been such that the 45° jet curves have supported high-pressure for extended periods. The results in both years have been very similar in the placement and number of named storms and their tracking parameters.
It could also be noted that last hurricane season was very active also but the eclipse grid was placed just slightly to the east of this season. The storms last year ran into Florida or just to the east of the storms this year. In other words the grid has shifted to the east and the storm track has shifted to the east.

This year was an unusual year in that the eclipse points only moved a few degrees from last year. In October that should change and by next season the high pressure should be centered in the Atlantic rather than in the Maritime Provinces. As a result there should be a drop in the intensity of storms during hurricane season.


Fig.3


Fig.3

The third figure shows the position of the soon to occur eclipse on October 3, 2005. On that date the 45° jet curve from the solar point will shift 8° to the west. The old solar influenced jet curve is off of the east coast of Florida. It has been active in supporting the ridge formation that has been steering the storms into the Gulf of Mexico. On the chart a pink area is the position of a disturbance that is presently (September 28, 2005) building south of Cuba off of a tropical wave there. Most predictions have this storm taking a horizontal track across Central America at this time. However, if the storm is slow to build it will be in the longitude of 86° W just at the time of the eclipse. This would mean that if it were anywhere along the 45° jet curve from the new point (red curve) it would be deepened quite suddenly. It is curious that this jet curve from the new solar point is precisely placed along the meridian of longitude that has caused such a ruckus this hurricane season. Since timing is all for hurricanes this scenario remains to be seen. However, if the storm lingers in the Caribbean and the warm loop eddy at 86° W longitude continues to be problematic this may be another trial in the making for the Gulf Coast during this turbulent season.

Doc Weather feels that studies like this support the climatological concept of decadal influences from a perspective that is different from the mainstream. The hope is that an understanding of the uncanny similarity between these two years can be extended to include not just their physical parameters but also the rhythmic significance of their similarly placed eclipse points.