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Upcoming patterns and nodal influences - 10.10.05


The current nodal station has calmed down hurricane eruptions.


Fig.1


Fig.1

The chart shows the influence of two events that accompany each other at six-month intervals. One is the solar eclipse. This event happened on October 3rd and created a new eclipse point near the west coast of Africa. The eclipse grid shown in figure 1 has this point generating a low- pressure value on the jet curve that runs down the mountain chains of the East Coast. There has been a tendency for low-pressure to form on this point since then because of its relationship to the position of the lunar node. The other event is that when a solar eclipse happens the lunar node is on station at the same time. It may not be in the longitude of the eclipse but it most often is on station at the time of the solar eclipse.

It happens this cycle that the node on station is positioned at a low-pressure value to the new eclipse point. This has been coincident with the establishment of a persistent low-pressure value on the 45° jet curve from this new point. At the same time the old lunar eclipse point in Aries has also been under influence of the stationary lunar node. This influence has been to high-pressure values. The jet curve for this is over the western Atlantic due south of the Maritime Provinces. This aspect has created a persistent blocking high out over the Atlantic that has steered storms up the coast in a winter like pattern. This high has recently interacted with the continental low to create a situation where high pressure to the east has blocked the emergence of lows off of the continent. This has steered the remnants of Hurricane Tammy into the flooding conditions in the northeast.


Fig.2


Fig.2

In figure 2 we can see a chart of the precipitation anomalies for the fall of 1995. The eclipse points for that year are very close to the eclipse points for the upcoming fall. The chart shows much higher than normal precipitation (darker green) in both the northeast and northwest corners of the US with much below normal precipitation (red) in the west and the central states. Slightly above normal precipitation (middle green) can be seen in the Dakotas and along the southeastern coast. This would indicate a ridge formation over the west steering storms into the PNW and a nor'easter pattern for storms on the East Coast.


Fig.3


Fig.3

Looking at the temperature anomaly chart for the fall of 95 and the winter of 96 we can see support for the precipitation scenario. A ridge on the West Coast would bring warmer (red) than normal temperatures into the southern areas and colder (blue) than normal temperatures for most of the US east of the Rockies with especially cold temperatures in the Midwest. If current patterns described in the first part of this article hold through the next eclipse on October 17, then we can expect to find similar temperature and precipitation patterns to these last two charts in the forecast for the upcoming fall and winter.