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Historic hurricane tracking patterns - 09.26.04


Tracking and landfall patterns for the major category 4 hurricanes, Ivan, Camille and Baker are strikingly similar. Learn why fluctuations in the Bermuda High are behind these amazing storms and this year's unprecedented hurricane season.

All persons agree that this is a very unusual hurricane season. Doc Weather looks at this season with a weather eye cocked towards the planetary flux model. In this article the sequence of charts will depict the positions of eclipse lines for the three years with the greatest number of hurricanes since records were kept. The placements and aspecting planets will be described and then this information will be placed along with eclipse lines for this current, very active year for the purposes of comparison. If you would like to track these storms yourself go to hurricane tracks


Fig.1


Fig.1

In the first chart we see a strong high-pressure area in place over the Western Atlantic. This is known as the Bermuda High. In active hurricane seasons this high-pressure areas is close to the Florida coast. When this placement occurs storms traveling from the eastern Atlantic steer around the bottom of the high as they move west in the flow of the Trade Winds. In the planetary flux model, the placement of this high-pressure area is a function of the placement of the eclipse points in that season. The years of the most numerous hurricanes that are described in this article have some very common eclipse point placements. In addition to the placement of the eclipse points, strong hurricane seasons most often arise when slow moving planets are influencing the eclipse points without interference from rapidly moving planets. These conditions support the establishment of strong and persistent blocking high-pressure areas that dominate world weather patterns for extended periods. The longer a blocking ridge stays in place the harder it is to get it to dissolve. This allows hurricanes transiting the Atlantic ample time to establish a strong track with momentum. The tracks that result from such a placement are depicted in the first figure as gray arrows moving from the mid-Atlantic to the western Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.


Fig.2


Fig.2

In figure 2 we see the placement of the eclipse points in 1950. There are two 22° eclipse lines that bracket the Bermuda High. In that year there were eleven hurricanes. Five of the eleven came close enough to the United States to create a very active hurricane season. Hurricanes, Able, Baker, Easy and King followed the southern edge of the centrally placed high during this year. The track of hurricane Baker a category three storm especially resembled the tracks of Ivan and Camille. During this year, planetary influences on the eclipse points supported strong high-pressure values on the eclipse points for extended periods of time, with Jupiter as the key influence.


Fig.3


Fig.3

The year 1969 had twelve storms that achieved hurricane status including the infamous Camille. The tracking parameters were similar that year to 1995. However, the activity for 1969 didn't take place on the 22° jet curves from remote eclipse points. The eclipse points that year were right over the Caribbean covering the same area as the 22° jet curves from 1950. The tracking for these storms was similar to the tracking of 1950 with Camille, a storm with a track that was incredibly similar to Hurricane Baker in 1950. Both of these storms also bore a remarkable resemblance to the recent track of Ivan. Once again a subtropical high over the western Atlantic steered the storms into the East Coast of the United States and the Gulf of Mexico. During both of these years, strong planetary aspects to the eclipse points that supported high-pressure readings were in place for long periods of time. This allowed the subtropical high over Bermuda to block the passage of the storm over the western Atlantic for extended periods of time. In 1969 the lunar node provided the long-term aspect to the eclipse points that was provided by Jupiter in 1950. The results were remarkable similar.


Fig.4


Fig.4

In 1995 there were 19 named storms, and eleven hurricanes. Four of the hurricane tracks were steered towards the United States by a strong sub tropical high over Bermuda. The tracks were similar to the tracks in 1969. However, the placement of the eclipse lines was very different from the placement of the eclipse lines from 1969. The eclipse points were remote from the Bermuda area over the western coast of Africa. However, the 45° jet curve lines from the eclipse points in 1995 bracket an area from the longitude of Greenland to the longitude of Bermuda, the exact area of the other examples in this article. The high extended to the western 45° jet curve from the pair. The western edge of this high was the preferred northward turning point for storms that year. During 1995 Saturn was over the central Atlantic. The rest of the planets were strewn across the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Saturn acted on the eclipse points independent of any other influence. It just so happened that during the hurricane season Saturn regularly aspected the eclipse points to strong high-pressure values keeping the Bermuda High as a persistent feature for hurricane steering parameters.


Fig.5


Fig.5

It can be seen from figure 5 that the present year 2004 has eclipse points situated in a good place to create a blocking high over the western Atlantic. The current placement close to the points in 1995 has revealed a tracking pattern similar to that year with the exception that the placement of the subtropical high this year was a bit closer to the Florida Coast. The high-pressure resulted from strong aspects of the node on the eclipse points over Africa. The closer placement of the Bermuda High near to Florida however, was a combination of aspects of Jupiter over the central Pacific creating strong high-pressure values on the eclipse grid from the west and aspects from the lunar node over Africa also creating high-pressure values. The strong ridge forming forces on the 72° jet curve from the western pair of eclipse lines linked to the Bermuda high and drew it near to the coast. This linkage created a kind of tunnel for storms to transit the Western Atlantic. The westward transiting storms would skirt along the southern side of the Bermuda high looking for a place to turn north. As they approached the continent the nearest place to make a turn was a weak place in between the two ridges. The result was a highly unusual flurry of major storms into Florida.


Fig.6


Fig.6

The final image is a composite of all of the lines from all of the years on one chart. It can be seen that even though these years are separated by large time frames the planetary flux model provides a way for observing the similarities between the different years and provides a glimpse at the common lineage of some of the historically most severe storms in the Western Atlantic.