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Climate and motion in arc. - 02.06.06


Understanding climate implications of motion in arc events among planets.

Experiments carried out over many years have consistently shown that the strongest influence that the planets have upon the weather is through the influences of what could be called harmonic resonances. These resonances are produced on what are known in Doc Weather as eclipse lines

Changes in the atmosphere along the eclipse lines can be observed as planets move towards the eclipse points or away from them in celestial longitude. The motion of a planet from one degree of celestial longitude to the next degree of celestial longitude is known as motion in arc. When an eclipse point is isolated from any other planetary influences, and it is approached by a fast moving planet like Mars, an interesting pattern can be seen.


Fig.1


Fig.1

As the planet approaches the point, high and low pressures alternate in the northern extensions of what are known in Doc Weather as jet curves Figure 1 depicts the situation when Mars is making a fast approach to an eclipse point and passes a position that is 10 degrees of arc from the eclipse point. On that day two high pressure areas most likely will briefly appear on the 45° jet curves.


Fig.2


Fig.2

Then, on the next day, (figure2) as Mars passes 9 degrees of arc to the eclipse point the pressure signature shifts to low pressure on the 45° jet curves. Following along, when Mars crosses the point at 5 degrees from the eclipse point a high would once again appear on the jet curves. Then as Mars would finally conjunct the point another low would appear. These last two shifts are not illustrated. The effects of these rapid motions can often be observed in the longitude of the 45° jet curves from the eclipse point. The rapid movements are very hard to read in the atmosphere. The most often contribute to an unsettled condition that fluxes from day to day. Conditions that can be used for more lasting patterns normally unfold from the aspects and motion in arc events of slower moving planets.


Fig.3


Fig.3

To illustrate the effects of a longer aspect by a slower moving planet, figure 3 depicts the conditions for the second week of December 2000, Uranus is depicted at an angle of 9° from the eclipse point at 13° Capricorn. Two 45° jet curves from this point are drawn. One is over the Atlantic and the other over the Pacific. As Uranus stood in this low- pressure aspect to the eclipse point there was a pattern in which a persistent low- pressure area formed over the eastern side of the Gulf of Alaska. At the same time persistent low-pressure centered over the Maritime Provinces and Nova Scotia. The jet stream during this time resembled the gently curved pink arrow. The low over the Gulf of Alaska was balanced by the low over the Maritimes. The storm jet ran horizontally or zonally across the northern tier of states. This pattern brought moist Pacific air into the northern tier of states and resulted in strong snows in the Great Lakes area. The placement of these lows was coincident with the motions of Uranus at that time. Since Uranus moves so slowly the time frame of this pattern had a much longer duration than the similar pattern in the Mars transit seen in figures1and 2. The Mars motion in arc event would not change large patterns in the climatic regime during the season in which Mars was transiting the point. The Uranus motion in arc event, happening over a much longer time had an effect on the climate regime due to the length of the transit.


Fig.4


Fig.4

The chart in figure 4depicts the changes on the 11th of December, when Uranus moved in arc one degree of longitude. This placed Uranus at a 10° aspect to the eclipse point. Most often a planet at a 10° angle from the aspected eclipse point will stimulate high pressure along the jet curves.

In the weeks that followed the motion in arc of Uranus to a 10° aspect, two symmetrical high pressure areas formed and were persistent in the areas which had just been the site of persistent low pressure areas. The jet stream during this period resembled the strongly curving blue arrow. The high in the Gulf of Alaska balanced the high in the Maritimes. As the moon passed across the eclipse point both highs would simultaneously weaken for a day or so and then simultaneously build back up. Highs in these positions push the jet stream far to the north on the West Coast and far to the south on the East Coast. This was a radical change of climatic regimes that completely coincided with the motion in arc events of the slower moving Uranus. From these examples among hundreds we can see a considerable difference in climatic scenarios emerged from the planetary motion in arc of merely one degree. Normal methods of climate study do not really shed this kind of light upon such radical shifts in regimes. Motion in arc studies in the context of eclipse points and jet curves can offer such remarkable insights.